Traveling in Germany by train to smaller villages. Would there be buses to such places like Clausen, Donsieders, & Gross Vargula?

I will be traveling to Europe for business and think that a rail pass will meet my needs for most areas. However, some of the smaller villages do not have train stations (Clausen, Donsidiers, Gross Vargula, etc.). Are there buses that can take me to the smaller locations (from the locations that do have rail) or am I better renting a car for my trip? I would also like to make side trips to Strasbourg and Brussels.
1 person has
this question
+1
Reply
  • Jeff (Official Rep) June 04, 2015 18:48
    Thank you for your question, Luana.

    The closest rail stations to Clausen and Donsieders are Waldfischbach or Pirmasens Nord.

    Waldfischbach would be about 7 km driving distance from Clausen and 5 km from Donsieders.

    Pirmasens would be about 11 km driving distance from both Clausen and Donsieders.

    Waldfischbach or Pirmasens Nord are both only accessed by regional trains out of Kaiserslautern. The trains on this line don't accept reservations, so any rail pass that includes Germany is all that would be needed to board.

    Kaiserslautern itself is about 29.5 km driving distance from Clausen and 27 km driving distance from Donsieders.

    I believe there are buses from both Waldfischbach or Pirmasens Nord to Clausen and Donsieders, although it appears as though it might be easier from Pirmasens Nord. A bus ride from Pirmasens Nord to Clausen would be about 10 to 15 minutes, and a bus ride from Pirmasens Nord to Donsieders would be under 10 minutes. I'm not sure if there would just be buses right from Kaiserslautern.

    The closest rail stations to Großvargula are Döllstädt, Gräfentonna, or Bad Langensalza.

    Döllstädt would be about 12 km driving distance from Großvargula.

    Gräfentonna would be about 6 km driving distance from Großvargula.

    Bad Langensalza would be about 13.5 km driving distance from Großvargula.

    Döllstädt, Gräfentonna, and Bad Langensalza are located along a regional rail line that runs between Erfurt and Leinefelde. The trains on this line don't accept reservations, so any rail pass that includes Germany is all that would be needed to board.

    Döllstädt and Bad Langensalza are also stops of the regional trains that operate on the route between Erfurt and Kassel (Note: the 'InterCity Express' trains operating along this same route do not stop in either Döllstädt or Bad Langensalza.)

    Erfurt itself is about 35 km driving distance from Großvargula.

    I'm not able to verify the existence of any specific buses between any of these towns and Großvargula; however, the rail stations in Döllstädt, Gräfentonna, and Bad Langensalza are very close.

    Of course, Strasbourg and Brussels have rail stations and easily accessible by rail.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated happy, confident, thankful, excited indifferent, undecided, unconcerned kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • Thank you for this information. I am trying to decide which pass would be best. Since I will be traveling primarily in Germany and only taking day trips to France and Belgium, would it be better to get a Eurail Germany pass and just pay the one time fees to travel to Brussels and Strasbourg? My husband will be coming with me and will not be with me on every trip I take due to his work schedule, does that negate the 2 traveler discount? He will be with me about 80% of the time, but not every trip.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated happy, confident, thankful, excited indifferent, undecided, unconcerned kidding, amused, unsure, silly

  • Jeff (Official Rep) June 10, 2015 15:48
    Hi Luana.

    That would really depend on your specific itinerary. What you purchase for rail travel would depend on that and various other factors. However, if your only day-trips will be to Brussels and Strasbourg, then your idea to purchase regular tickets for those trips would likely be your best option. In fact, the German Rail Pass would enable you to receive a discounted rate called the 'Passholder 3' on a 'TGV Est' train to Strasbourg. 'TGV Est' trains are high-speed trains that connect Strasbourg with cities in Germany that include Karlsruhe, Mannheim, Frankfurt, Stuttgart, and Munich.

    Otherwise, if taking another type of train from Germany to Strasbourg, your German Rail Pass would cover you to the border, and then you would be charged a small supplement locally to cover you for the short distance between the border and the station in Strasbourg.

    To ensure that you're being quoted the 'Passholder 3' rate for a TGV Est train between any of the cities I mentioned and Strasbourg, you would take the following steps:

    1.) Click on 'Book your Rail Pass Reservations' on our homepage, enter the route, and indicate that you'll be traveling with a 'German Rail Pass'.

    2.) Locate one of the direct 'TGV Est' trains and click the 'View' button for the fare listed under your preferred class of service (for this route, that would be 'Premier' for 1st class and 'Economy' for 2nd class).

    3.) When you click 'View', a box will expand out underneath with the 'Ticket Flexibility' options. The 'Passholder 3' rate would generally be found under the 'Semi Flexible' option under 'Ticket Flexibility'. To verify, you would click 'Read More' for the 'Semi Flexible' option and the fare should be labeled as 'TGV Est European Passholder 3'.

    4.) Be sure the Passholder 3 option is checked and click 'Select' to proceed and add it to your 'Itinerary' (shopping cart).

    Generally, these trains can be booked once within 90 days of an intended date of departure.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned kidding, amused, unsure, silly happy, confident, thankful, excited

  • Jeff (Official Rep) June 10, 2015 15:48
    Travel to Brussels from Germany would involve taking a high-speed 'Thalys' train via Cologne (these trains also can stop in Essen, Duisburg, Dusseldorf, or Aachen) or a high-speed 'InterCity Express' train via Frankfurt or Cologne. Therefore, you would end up connecting through one of these cities, most likely Cologne, to enter into Belgium from Germany.

    If you happen to take a 'Thalys train' to get to Brussels, you would have to purchase a regular ticket for the full route of the journey.

    You would purchase regular tickets for a 'Thalys' train from Cologne to Brussels by clicking on 'Find Fares & Schedules' (instead of 'Book your Rail Pass Reservations') on our homepage and entering the route, this time not mentioning that you'll be traveling with any type of rail pass. The 'Thalys' trains would be labeled accordingly when you pull up the results of your search.

    If you happen to take one of the 'InterCity Express' trains to get to Brussels, your German Rail Pass would cover as far as the border, and you would have to purchase an additional ticket to cover you for the length of this route that runs between the border and Brussels. The ticket you would purchase to cover between the border and Brussels would be from the town of Aachen to Brussels. The 'InterCity Express' trains between Germany and Brussels would still require reservations in addition to the German Rail Pass and the Aachen-Brussels ticket.

    If you locate an 'InterCity Express' train (from Cologne or from Frankfurt), you would purchase passholder reservations for the entire route of the journey by switching back to 'Book your Rail Pass Reservations' (instead of 'Find Fares & Schedules'), entering the route, and indicating that you'll be traveling a 'Eurail Global Pass' or a 'Eurail Benelux-Germany Pass'. Even though you will actually be traveling with a German Rail Pass and a ticket from Aachen to Brussels for this journey, our system would just need you to enter a pass here that covers the entire route in order to allow you to purchase the passholder reservations. Otherwise, if you indicate that you'll be traveling with the German Rail Pass, our website will think that you do not have the necessary pass/ticket coverage for the route and fail to quote you the appropriate passholder reservation fees. When you pull up the results of your search, the 'InterCity Express' trains will be labeled a such, or else they may also be labeled solely with the 'DB Bahn' logo.

    You would then purchase the Aachen-Brussels ticket by clicking on 'Find Fares & Schedules' on our homepage and entering these cities ('Aachen' to 'Brussels'), while not mentioning that you'll be traveling with any type of rail pass.

    To ensure you are issued the appropriate ticket from Aachen to Brussels, just make sure the 'InterCity Express' train you select here corresponds to the one from Cologne or Frankfurt that you booked reservations on. You can do this by matching the train number and the arrival time into Brussels. Even though you are booking a ticket that shows Aachen as a starting point, that does not mean you would get off the train there. You would just remain on the train for the full journey from Cologne or Frankfurt to Brussels.

    Generally, tickets and reservations for these trains can be booked once within 90 days of an intended date of departure.
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned kidding, amused, unsure, silly happy, confident, thankful, excited

  • Jeff (Official Rep) June 10, 2015 15:53
    To receive the 'Twin Pass' rate for the German Rail Pass, you and your husband would actually both have to be traveling together at all times. If you will not be traveling together at all times, you would just purchase this pass at the regular rate.

    You would purchase the German Rail Pass here: http://www.raileurope.com/rail-ticket....
  • (some HTML allowed)
    How does this make you feel?
    Add Image
    I'm

    e.g. sad, anxious, confused, frustrated indifferent, undecided, unconcerned kidding, amused, unsure, silly happy, confident, thankful, excited