Which trains will be covered as part of EuRail pass for 3 countries - Italy,Swiss,France?

Hi,

Me and my husband are planning to go for Europe trip in May this year and am checking for various train options to travel among 3 bordering countries from Italy to Switzerland to France.

Here is my Itinerary, planned to commute by trains :

1. Rome to Pisa
2. Pisa to Venice
3. Venice to Zurich
4. Zurich to Mt. Titlis
5. Mt. Titlis to Spiez
6. Spiez to Jungfrau
7. Jungfrau to Spiez
8. Spiez to Zermatt
9. Zermatt to Paris

Can you please suggest if I opt to take EuRail pass for 3 bordering countries valid for 10 days + free day which costs around $650 per person, will I be able to travel in all the routes I have planned above and in all types of trains like Regional / TGV /
IC/ Reserved trains, Scenic trains like Bernina Exp etc. ??

And also within Rome and Paris for local commute can you get any benefits with this Eurail pass?

I am seeing that day by day train ticket fares are increasing so much. So, need to get better idea and book the best option with good fare as soon as possible.

Also, what are the benefits of getting eurail pass versus swiss travel pass? which one gives more price savings while travelling across these 3 countries by train??

Kindly provide your suggestions.

Thanks,
Gayathri
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  • Can someone please respond? As i saw one of the train tickets increased from 33$ to 55$ in a day.. need to book the best rate tickets.. kindly advise...
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  • Jeff (Official Rep) April 12, 2016 15:28
    Hi,

    The Eurail Select Pass would cover ticket costs for all the requested routes, except for the mountain excursions to Mount Titlis and Jungfraujoch, as well as the rail line that leads into and out of Zermatt. However, the Eurail Select Pass would still enable you to receive discounts on these other segments of your itinerary.

    You would purchase the Eurail Select Pass here: https://www.raileurope.com/rail-tickets-passes/eurail-select-pass/index.html.

    Rome to Pisa

    From Rome to Pisa, there are direct InterCity (IC) trains and direct Frecciabianca trains. These trains do require reservations in addition to the pass.

    For travel with a rail pass, you would purchase reservations by entering the route on our homepage (www.raileurope.com) and indicating the type of pass with which you'll be traveling with (i.e. a 'Eurail Three Country Select Pass').

    Pisa to Venice

    A connection from Pisa to Venice involves changing trains once in Florence en route. The trains from Pisa to Florence don't accept reservations, so the rail pass is all you'd need to board. In contrast, the trains from Florence to Venice are high-speed Frecciargento or Frecciarossa trains on which reservations would be required in addition to the pass.

    For travel with a rail pass, you would purchase reservations for the segment from Florence to Venice by entering the cities on our homepage (www.raileurope.com) and indicating the type of pass with which you'll be traveling with (i.e. a 'Eurail Three Country Select Pass').

    For planning purposes, you can still just check schedules for the non-reservable segment from Pisa to Florence by doing a separate search on our website and not indicating that you'll be traveling with any type of pass.

    Note: From Florence to Venice, there are also trains called 'Italo' trains, but these trains do not accept rail passes. Therefore, you would want to be sure to choose one of the Frecciargento or Frecciarossa trains.

    Venice to Zurich

    The most direct connections from Venice to Zurich involve changing trains once in Milan en route; however, I'm assuming this is the segment where you plan on taking the Bernina Express scenic route.

    To connect up with the Bernina Express route, you would head to either Tirano or Lugano.

    A connection from Venice to Tirano involves changing trains once in Milan en route, as would a connection from Venice to Lugano.

    The actual Bernina Express route would then involve taking a bus from Lugano to Tirano and then a train from Tirano to either St Moritz or Chur. Otherwise, you could just head straight to Tirano from Milan and only do the train portion of the Bernina Express route.

    A connection from St Moritz to Zurich involves changing trains once in either Chur or Landquart en route. From Chur, there are direct trains up to Zurich.

    Trains from Venice to Milan are Frecciabianca or Frecciarossa trains on which reservations would be required in addition to the rail pass.

    From Milan to Lugano, reservations would only be required on the EuroCity (EC) trains. EuroCity trains on this route are the ones with 2 digit train numbers or 3 digit train numbers that begin with a '1'. There are also regional trains from Milan to Lugano on which reservations are not even accepted. Therefore, the rail pass is all that would be needed to board one of these regional trains. The regional trains on this route are the ones that have 5 digit train numbers.

    Trains from Milan to Tirano are all regional trains that don't accept reservations. Therefore, the rail pass is all you'd need to board any of these trains.

    The Bernina Express bus from Lugano to Tirano and the train from Tirano to either St Moritz or Chur would both require reservations in addition to the pass. Currently, however, the Bernina Express segments (including both the bus and the train) are only able to be reserved by calling us. We can be reached at 1-800-622-8600.

    There are many more options from Tirano to St. Moritz on the Bernina than Tirano to Chur; however, Chur would provide for easier access to Zurich. There are frequently operating direct trains from Chur to Zurich that take about 1 to 1.5 hours in duration, whereas a connection from St. Moritz to Zurich would involve changing trains in Chur or Landquart en route and take about 3.5 hours in duration.

    Reservations are not necessary on the trains from Chur to Zurich and the trains that would comprise of a connection from St Moritz to Zurich (via Chur or Landquart). Therefore, the rail pass would be all you'd need to board.

    For travel with a rail pass, you can purchase reservations for the trains from Venice to Milan and the EuroCity trains from Milan to Lugano by entering each route on our homepage (www.raileurope.com) and indicating the type of pass with which you'll be traveling (i.e. a 'Eurail Select Pass').

    For planning purposes, you can still view schedules for the non-reservable segments from Milan to Tirano and either Chur to Zurich or St Moritz to Zurich on our site.

    Zurich to Engelberg/Mount Titlis

    An excursion from Zurich to Mount Titlis consists of a train from Zurich to Lucerne, another train from Lucerne to Engelberg, a cable car from Engelberg to Trübsee, a second cable car from Trübsee to Stand, and a third cable car from Stand to Titlis.

    For this excursion, the rail pass would only cover you as far as Engelberg; however, it would enable you to receive a 25% discount for the remaining part of the journey (the cable cars between Engelberg and Titlis). To receive this discount, you would just have to purchase the '1 Day Round-Trip Journey From Engelberg - For Use Only With Eurail Pass Which Includes Switzerland' option of the Mount Titlis Pass offered on our site.

    The trains from Zurich to Lucerne and Lucerne to Engelberg don't accept reservations, so the Eurail Select Pass is all you'd need to board.

    The '1 Day Round-Trip Journey From Engelberg - For Use Only With Eurail Pass Which Includes Switzerland' option of the Mount Titlis Pass is all you'd need to board the cable cars between Engelberg and Titlis.

    For planning purposes, you can view schedules for the trains from Zurich to Lucerne and Lucerne to Engelberg by entering each of those routes on our homepage, www.raileurope.com.

    Mount Titlis/Engelberg to Spiez

    You would take the cable cars back down to Engelberg in order to begin your trip to Spiez. A connection from Engelberg to Spiez involves 2 train changes en route; once in Lucerne and then once in Bern.

    These trains don't accept reservations, so the Eurail Select Pass is all you would need to board.

    For planning purposes, you can view schedules for connections from Engelberg to Spiez by entering the route on our homepage, www.raileurope.com.

    Spiez to Interlaken/Jungfraujoch

    The starting point for the ascent to Jungfraujoch is Interlaken. From Spiez, there are direct trains to Interlaken. The Eurail Select Pass would only cover as far as this point. While the Eurail Select Pass doesn't cover travel between Interlaken and Jungfraujoch, it would enable you to receive a 25% discount. To receive the 25% discount, you would purchase the '1 Day Round-Trip Journey from Interlaken - For Use Only With Eurail Pass Which Includes Switzerland' option of the 'Jungfraujoch Top of Europe' that's offered on our site. To purchase the 'Jungfraujoch Top of Europe', you would click here: https://www.raileurope.com/activities/jungfraujoch/index.html.

    The excursion between Interlaken and Jungfraujoch consists of the following segments:

    - Interlaken to Grindelwald or Interlaken to Lauterbrunnen on the Bernese Oberland Railway

    - Grindelwald to Kleine Scheidegg to Lauterbrunnen to Kleine Scheidegg on the Wengernalp Railway

    - Kleine Scheidegg on the Jungfrau Railway (the highest railway in Europe)

    Reservations are not accepted for any part of this trip. The 'Jungfraujoch Top of Europe' is an open voucher that you would use to hop on any of these trains on the journey up to Jungfraujoch and back. The 'Jungfraujoch Top of Europe' is only valid for a period of 24 hours, so your round-trip would just have to be completed within that time frame.

    You do not need reservations on the short trains from Spiez to Interlaken, so the Eurail Select Pass is all you'd need to board.

    For planning purposes, you can check schedules for the trains from Spiez to Interlaken by entering the route on our homepage, www.raileurope.com.

    If you'd like to get more of an idea of what the Jungfraujoch excursion itself would look like, you would be able to view schedules for each of these segments, as well. To do so, you would just have to piece together the connection by doing a separate search for each segment. Therefore, you would do one search for trains from Interlaken to Grindelwald, another search for connecting trains from Grindelwald to Kleine Scheidegg, and another search for connecting trains from Kleine Scheidegg to Jungfraujoch. For the other route, you would do one search for trains from Interlaken to Lauterbrunnen, another search for connecting trains from Lauterbrunnen to Kleine Scheidegg, and another search for connecting trains from Kleine Scheidegg to Jungfraujoch.

    Jungfraujoch/Interlaken to Spiez

    You would just head back down to Interlaken in order to connect to the trains to Spiez. Once again, you do not need reservations for a train between Interlaken and Spiez, so the Eurail Select Pass is all you would need to board. For planning purposes, you can still view their schedules by entering the route on our homepage, www.raileurope.com.

    Spiez to Zermatt

    A connection from Spiez to Zermatt would involve changing trains once in Visp en route. The Eurail Select Pass covers trains from Spiez to Visp; however, the rail line from Visp to Zermatt is part of a privately owned portion of the 'Glacier Express scenic route' on which the Eurail Select Pass would not be valid.

    To be covered on the privately owned segment from Visp to Zermatt, you would purchase the 'Visp Zermatt' option of a special ticket called the 'Glacier Express Eurail Passholder Fare'. You would purchase the 'Glacier Express Eurail Passholder Fare' ticket here: https://www.raileurope.com/activities/glacier-express-eurail-passholder-fare/index.html.

    The trains you'll take from Spiez to Visp and Visp to Zermatt don't accept reservations, so the Eurail Select Pass and 'Glacier Express Eurail Passholder Fare', respectively, are all you would need to board.

    For planning purposes, you can still view their schedules by entering the segments on our homepage, www.raileurope.com.

    Zermatt to Paris

    A connection from Zermatt to Paris involves 2 train changes along the way; once in Visp and then once in either Lausanne or Geneva. The trains from Lausanne or Geneva to Paris are high-speed TGV Lyria trains.

    Once again, the segment from Zermatt to Visp is part of the privately owned portion of the 'Glacier Express scenic route' Therefore, for your trip out of Zermatt, you would need to purchase the 'Zermatt Visp' option of the 'Glacier Express Eurail Passholder Fare' that I mentioned above.

    The trains you'll take from Zermatt to Visp and either Visp to Lausanne or Visp to Geneva don't accept reservations. Therefore, the 'Glacier Express Eurail Passholder Fare' and Eurail Select Pass are all you would need to board these segments. For planning, you can still view schedules for these segments by entering the routes on our homepage, www.raileurope.com.

    On a TGV Lyria from Lausanne to Paris, the Eurail Select Pass would enable you to receive a discounted rate called the 'Passholder 1'.

    On a TGV Lyria from Geneva to Paris, the Eurail Select Pass would enable you to receive a discounted rate called the 'Passholder 2'.

    On these trains, the 'Passholder 1' would be a greater discount than the 'Passholder 2'.

    The 'Passholder 1' on a TGV Lyria from Lausanne to Paris can be purchased by entering the route on our homepage (www.raileurope.com) and indicating that you'll be traveling with the Eurail Select Pass.

    However, due to an error, the 'Passholder 2' rate on TGV Lyria trains from Geneva to Paris is currently not able to be booked on our website. If you search the route from Geneva to Paris on our site and indicate that you'll be traveling with the Eurail Select Pass, you may be quoted a 'Passholder 1' rate, but this is in error. Please be advised that the 'Passholder 1' rate on this train would actually not be valid for travel with the Eurail Select Pass. With that being the case, if the schedules work out for you, you might want to just take the route that goes via Lausanne instead.

    If, for whatever reason, you decide to make the trip from Zermatt to Paris via Geneva, you would have to call us in order to purchase the correct reservations. We can be reached at 1-800-622-8600.
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    • Jeff (Official Rep) December 28, 2016 18:45
      Update:

      Starting in 2017, a Eurail Select Pass that includes Switzerland will begin covering ticket costs for the stretch of railway on the Glacier Express line between Visp and Zermatt. Therefore, the 'Glacier Express Eurail Passholder Fare' ticket would no longer be necessary to cover this segment.

      Additionally, with regard to the excursion up to Jungfraujoch, reservations are now possible for the Jungfrau Railway segment between Kleine Scheidegg and Jungfraujoch. In fact, as a supplement to the ‘Jungfraujoch Top of Europe’, reservations are now highly recommended on the Kleine Scheidegg-Jungfraujoch segment for travel between the months of May and October. The Kleine-Scheidegg-Jungfraujoch reservations can be purchased locally at the preceding stations in Interlaken, Grindelwald, Lauterbrunnen, and Wengen; as well as the nearby station of Mürren.

      Reservations are still not accepted for the segments between Interlaken and Kleine Scheidegg, whether you take the route via Grindelwald or the route via Lauterbrunnen. Therefore, the ‘Jungfraujoch Top of Europe’ would be all you’d need to board for these segments.
    • Jeff (Official Rep) April 20, 2018 15:42
      Update:

      As of April 2018:

      ‘Passholder 2’ and ‘Passholder 3’ rates on TGV Lyria trains (i.e. Geneva-Paris) are no longer valid. For a TGV Lyria to be covered, Eurail Passes must now include both countries being traveled through.
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